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Research Paper And Syllabus

11-780: Research Design and Writing

Full Syllabus

Course Intro

Formulating Your Grand Vision

  • Week 2 Lecture 1 (09/06): Research Politics
    • Bem, D. J. (2003). Writing the Empirical Journal Article , in Darley, Zanna, & Roediger (Eds.) The Compleat Academic: A Practical Guide for the Beginning Social Scientist, 2nd Edition , Washington DC: American Psychological Association.

Conducting a Literature Review

Formulating a Hypothesis

  • Week 6 Lecture 1 (10/04): Building a Dissertation around a Hypothesis
    • Duo's Communication Competition talk
    • Informal presentations of hypotheses with feedback
    • We're going to look at the work of Constance Steinkeuler. We will look at how some of her earlier papers fed into her eventual dissertation . You can look at this artcile or this book chapter. We'll talk about how Constance's articles were similar and different to what was in her dissertation as part of thinking through a strategy for you building up to your own dissertation.
    • Week 6 Lecture 2 (10/06): Another Perspective on Building a Dissertation
    • Week 7 Lecture 2 (10/13): Limitations of Quantitative Research
    • Kerlinger, F. & Lee, H. (2000). Foundations of Behavioral Research , Fortworth: Harcourse Collecge Publishers, Chapters 18,19
    • Week 8 Lecture 1 (10/18): Begin Exploring the issue of Validity
    • Week 8 Lecture 2 (10/20): Guest Lecture: Building up to a qualitative dissertation
    • Week 9 Lecture 2 (10/27): More on Experimental Design/ Assign Formal Experimental Design Write Up
    • Week 10 Lecture 1 and 2 (11/01,11/03): Clarifications on Experimental Design
    • Week 11 Lecture 1 (11/08): Instruction on Statistical Analysis
    • Week 11 Lecture 2 (11/10): Discuss GLM
    • Week 12 Lecture 1 (11/15): Finish GLM, Discuss Pittfalls paper and Hao-Chuan's study/data, Assign peer review on Assignment 4
    • Week 12 Lecture 2 (11/17): Students present Assignment 4 + preliminary data analysis
    • Week 13 Lecture 1 (11/22): Talk about counter-balancing, Finish student presentations
  • Week 13 Lecture 2 (11/24): No Class: Thanksgiving Holiday !!!
  • Note that you should read the papers we will discuss the following week, which include
    cellphone paper and
    paper about when usability testing may be harmful

  • Week 14 Lecture 1 (11/29): Mahaveer's communication competition talk,critique cellphone paper, Assign Assignment 5 (due on Dec 1)
  • Week 14 Lecture 2 (12/01): Hye Ju's communication competition talk, in depth discussion of cellphone paper. Continue discussing post hoc analysis.
  • Week 15 Lecture 1 (12/06): Finish discussing the cell phone paper and discuss when formal usability testing may be harmful
  • Week 15 Lecture 2 (12/08): Critiques
    • IGNORE PAST THIS POINT -- This is last semester's syllabus

    Week 1: Course Intro

    Week 2: Research Ethics, IRB, Treatment of Human Subjects, Privacy

    • Lectures 3-4 (09/01, 09/03): Avoiding Common Research Ethics Blunders
      • White, Ronald F. (2007). Institutional Review Board Mission Creep: The Common Rule, Social Science, and the Nanny State, The Independent Review 11(4), pp. 547-564.
      • ACM Policy on Plagiarism
      • Definitions of Plagiarism
      • Slide deck related to research ethics from Dave Touretzky
      • The Belmont Report
      • (optional supplemental reading, will be passed out in class on Tuesday) Berg, B. L. (1998). Ethical Issues, in Berg, B. L. Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences: Third Edition , Boston: Allyn & Bacon
      • Assignment 2: Paper critique, due Tue., 09/08
        • Students work in pairs, assigning a paper to their partner to review, which could be their own paper.
      • Optional Assignment: Short on-line NIH course

    Week 3: Doing a Literature review

    • Lecture 5 (09/08): Getting Perspective: Reading and Synthesizing prior work
      • Berg, B. L. (1998). Designing Qualitative Research (excerpts on constructing a literature review), in Berg, B. L. Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences: Third Edition , Boston: Allyn & Bacon
      • Berg, B. L. (1998). Writing Research Papers: Sorting the Noodles from the Soup, in Berg, B. L. Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences: Third Edition , Boston: Allyn & Bacon

    Week 4: Epistomology of Research

    Week5 Review and Revise: The story of a journal article in progress

    • Lecture 9: Review of Literature Review Assignment + intro to review process
    • Lecture 10: More about Revision Cycles
      • For today's class, please revise your literature review and bring it to class for a peer review session.

    Weeks 6-9: Basic Experimental Design for Intrinsic and Extrinsic Evaluations

    • Lecture 11 (9/28): Hypotheses that pass the Grandmother test
    • Lecture 12 (9/30): Intrinsic versus extrinsic evaluation: appropriateness conditions and what you can claim based on each
      • Nielson, J. (1994). Usability Testing, in Usability Engineering , San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann, Chapter 6.
      • Al-Maskari, A., Sanderson, M., Clough, P. (2008). Relevance Judgments between TREC and Non-TREC Assessorts , in Proceedings of SIGIR ’08 , Singapore.
    • Lectures 13 (10/05): Basics of experimental design
    • Lecture 14-16 (10/07/, 10/12, 10/14): Face Validity, Internal Validity, External Validity, Reproducibility
    • Lecture 17 (10/19): In Class Presentation of Experimental Designs
      • Prepare an 8 minute presentation
    • Lecture 18 (10/21): Validity Discussion
    • Lecture 19 (10/26): In Class Extended Critique: "Workshoping a Paper"
    • Lecture 20 (10/28): In Class Extended Critique: "Workshoping a Paper"

    Weeks 11-14: Data Analysis and Interpretation

    • Lecture 21 (11/02): Conceptual overview of statistical analysis
    • Lecture 22 (11/04): (tentative) Nuts and bolts of using statistical analysis software and reporting analysis results
    • Lecture 23 (11/09): Reflecting on Methodology
    • Lecture 24 (11/11): Presenting Data Analyses
      • Student Presentations
      • Discussion of statistics and qualitative research (revevant chapter)
    • Lecture 25 (11/16): More on Presenting Data Analyses
    • Lecture 26 (11/18): Student Critiques
    • Lecture 27 (11/23): Building Up to a Dissertation
    • Lectures 28 (11/30): More on Building Up to a Dissertation
      • We will discuss Darren Gergle's dissertation work. His dissertation is linked to the bottom of this page . See his piblications listed there for 2002-2006
    • Lectures 29 (12/2): Audience Design: Writing for Nonspecialized Audiences
    • Final Exam: Due no later than December 12
      • Option 1: Write a formal critique of this paper using this document as a guide.
      • Option 2: Write a research proposal (approximately 3 pages) that answers: (1) What problem are you going to solve? (2) Why is it a problem? (3) Why is it important to solve it? (4) What are you going to do to solve it? (5) Why do you believe that course of action will lead you to a worthy research contribution?
      • Option 3: Redo one of the earlier assignments. You must do a significant revision. Turn in both the version you previously turned in and your revised version.

      Week 10: Genres of writing: Audience design and Connection between experimental design and argumentation

      • Lecture 15: Different funding sources
        • Eric Nyberg will give a valuable guest presentation on IARPA proposals, which you will notice are quite distinct from NSF proposals.
        • NSF Example RFP and Successful Proposal
      • Lecture 16: Dissertation vs Conference vs Workshop
        • We're going to look at the work of Constance Steinkeuler. We will look at how some of her earlier papers fed into her eventual dissertation . You can look at this artcile or this book chapter. We'll talk about how Constance's articles were similar and different to what was in her dissertation as part of thinking through a strategy for you building up to your own dissertation.
        • in class peer assessment of research designs
        • Assignment 5: Revised research design, due Thur., 10/22
        • Collection from Noah Smith that we looked at last year -- This is an excellent example of beautiful writing and scholarship in the language technologies area:
      • Lecture 17 (10/20): In Class Extended Critique: "Workshoping a Paper"
      • Lecture 18: Within Area versus General Audience
      • Lectures 19-20 (10/27; 10/29): Student Critiques
        • Assignment 6: Students give in-class critiques on selected papers (3 critiques per class period)
        • 10/27 critiques:
        • 10/29 critiques:
        • 11/03 critiques:
          • Jonas will present this paper
          • Carolyn will present a critique on this paper
          • Ravi Starzl communication competition talk

        Weeks 11-14: Data Analysis and Interpretation

        • Lecture 21 (11/05): Conceptual overview of statistical analysis
        • Lecture 21 (11/10): (tentative) Nuts and bolts of using statistical analysis software and reporting analysis results
        • Lecture 22 (11/12): Coding, aggregating, and disaggregating data
          • In class presentations about data reanalysis, ignore the rest of the readings listed here for now...
          • Map Task Stuff: Data set , My Instructions , My Slides
          • Walker, M. A., Kamm, C., & Litman, D. Towards Developing General Models of Usability with PARADISE. Natural Language Engineering, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2000.
          • Hajdinjak, M. & Mihelic, F. (2006). The PARADISE Evaluation Framework: Issues and Findings, Computational Linguistics Journal
          • other CL Jour Squibs on annotation methodology
            • Reliability Measurement without Limits [pdf]
        • Lectures 23-24 (11/17, 11/19): Beyond reporting: Interpreting and explaining results
          • Pete's communication competition talk on Tuesday
          • Jesse's communication competition talk on Thursday
          • Article by Micki Chi about qualitative analysis of verbal data
          • ignore the other readings listed here for now...
          • Choi, F., Wiemer-Hastings, P., & Moore, J. (2001). Latent Semantic Analysis for Text Segmentation , in Proceedings of EMNLP.
          • Bestgen, Y. (2006). Improving Text Segmentation Using Latent Semantic Analysis: A Reanalysis of Choi, Wiemer-Hastings, and Moore (2001), Computational Linguistics Journal.
          • In-class peer assessment of analyses
        • Lecture 25 Last Lecture for the semester (11/24): Moving forward after an unexpected result

    Welcome to English 102, taught by Davis Oldham. This page contains links to all the documents I will be passing out in class this quarter.

    Documents are organized according to the assignments with which they are associated. Right up front are course policies and links for help with writing.

    Please let me know if you find any problems with this site.

    1. Course Policies and Information
    2. Help with Writing
    3. Course Theme
    4. Preliminary Research Report
    5. 10 Sources
    6. Literature Review
    7. Sentence Outline
    8. Research Paper
    9. Extra Credit Assignment

    Course Policies and Information

    • Syllabus (PDF)
    • Grade Guideline, showing what grades mean to me.
    • Expectations of students and professor
    • Tutorial on deciphering your assignment, a good introduction to reading and understanding instructions, which is vital for success in college.
    • Paper Format for all essays
    • Sex/Gender Discrimination Shoreline Community College is committed to providing all students with a learning environment that is safe, supportive, and free from discrimination. Any form of sexual discrimination�sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship violence, or gender-based stalking�is a violation of Title IX (part of federal education law), and it must be reported. Title IX makes it clear that violence and harassment based on sex and gender is a Civil Rights offense subject to the same kinds of accountability and the same kinds of support applied to offenses against other protected categories such as race, national origin, etc. As your instructor, I have a mandatory reporting responsibility, and I am required by law to share with the College any information regarding sexual misconduct. For more information about Title IX, you can go to the SCC Title IX website. You can also contact Yvonne Terrell-Powell, Title IX Deputy Coordinator, at (206) 546-4559, or the Dean of Students, Kim Thompson, at (206) 546-4641.� If you would like to talk with someone in a confidential setting, please contact Counseling Services (206-546-4559).
    • Inclement Weather Policy

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    Help with Writing

    • Quotation Mechanics Describes some of the basic rules for including a quotation in a sentence.
    • Why Peer Review
      Every paper you write will be reviewed by at least one of your classmates. My reasons for doing this are explained in this document.
    • Avoiding Plagiarism One simple rule to avoid worlds of pain.
    • Western Oregon University's template on "voice markers," a PDF file that lists many common signal phrases for introducing or identifying another author's words or ideas included in your own writing.
    • Academic Phrase Bank at Manchester (UK) University. A comprehensive guide to the �nuts and bolts� of academic phraseology, covering such areas as how to introduce someone else�s work, referring to sources, describing methods, reporting results, and discussing findings; also general functions such as being critical, being cautious (i.e. how to introduce a source you have doubts about), comparing and contrasting, and many more.
    • These Writing Links comprise an entire page of links to helpful advice on key writing issues. Specifically, you can jump to any of these topics:
      1. Sentence Boundaries
      2. Paragraph Structure
      3. Thesis Statements
      4. Transitions, including Introductions and Conclusions
      5. Concision
      6. Sentence Variety
      7. Quotations
      8. Research
    • The Writing and Learning Studio (TWLS)
      TWLS provides instructional handouts and texts, a comfortable study environment, and drop–in tutoring for students in any discipline who want to work on college reading strategies, study skills, research papers, essays, or other kinds of writing assignments. Additionally, TWLS offers variable credit courses and workshops on topics such as note–taking, memory improvement, research writing, test–taking, and grammar.

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    Course Theme

    Currently the theme for the class is Social Movements. You can read more about the theme here.

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    Preliminary Research Report

    • Preliminary Research Report Instructions (PDF file) These are the official instructions for the assignment. Your grade will be based on how well your work follows these instructions. All of the following samples are in PDF format.
      • Paper outline This shows the organization your Preliminary Research Report should follow.
      • Sample paper with callouts showing the various required elements of the assignment.
      • Sample outlines developed in class, showing in detail what each section of the paper should cover (class notes from April 14, 2011).
      • Questions about the assignment, with my answers (class notes from April 15, 2011).
    • First Search: Instructions for Friday of week 1.
    • Principles of Citation (PDF)
    • Who are you and what are you doing here? by Mark Edmundson. This 2011 article from Oxford American poses a fundamental challenge to college students about the reasons they are attending college. Your job is to read it, think about the questions it poses, and write a page on how your research topic relates to those questions. Here is a more detailed explanation of the assignment.
    • The Shoreline Community College Library, which will be your first stop for doing research: finding sources, citing sources, and getting help.
    • Research Lib Guide by Shoreline librarian Claire Murata. A tour through the basics of doing research.
    • UW’s Research 101 Topics tutorial (PDF).
    • Prewriting Strategies (required) from the University of Kansas Writing Center (optional).
    • Developing a Research Question
    • What is a Thesis

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    10 Sources

    This is the first formal bibliography, or works cited list, you will submit. It can still change, but you must submit a list of at least 10 sources relevant to your topic at this time. See below for detailed instructions.

    • 10 Sources These are the official instructions for the assignment. Your grade will be based on how well your work follows these instructions.
    • Preparing to Search
    • Sources and Databases Class notes from January 28, 2013, listing types of sources and common databases used in searching (PDF).
    • Search Strategy Worksheet (PDF file)
    • UW's Research 101 Tutorial on searching (PDF)
    • Search Techniques
    • Types of Sources (PDF file)
    • The IRIS tutorials at Clark College are an excellent introduction to research process and resources. These two are especially relevant here:
    • Scholarly Source checklist (PDF file)
    • Searching WITH Sources
    • Refining Your Search
    • Skimming Sources
    • Content Notes
    • Research Guidelines: Notetaking, from Hunter College Reading and Writing Center, City University of New York
    • Taking Notes from Research Reading, from University of Toronto Writing web pages
    • Taking Purposeful Research Notes from the Landmark School in Prides Crossing, Massachusetts (PDF). A good system for keeping your notes organized. I think they make some unsupportable claims for their method, when they say that they've eliminated the problem of having to (re-)organize after taking notes. You often don't know what the subtopics are until you've taken your notes and played around with various possible ways of organizing information and ideas. Also, this seems geared toward a shorter and simpler sort of paper than students write in 102--more a report than a persuasive argument based on research. That said, however, I think the method is a good one.

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    Literature Review

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    Sentence Outline

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    Research Paper

    • Research Paper Instructions (PDF file) These are the official instructions for the assignment. Your grade will be based on how well your work follows these instructions.
    • Drafting the Research Paper
      • Developing a Topic—notes on how to expand a too-short research paper.
      • Paragraph structure Description and illustration of basic elements of paragraph structure, with a sample paragraph color-coded to show how the parts relate to each other (PDF file).
    • Principles of Citation (PDF)
    • WOU's template on "voice markers," a PDF file that lists many common signal phrases for introducing or identifying another author's words or ideas included in your own writing.
    • Incorporating References (required), from the University of Kansas Writing Center (optional).
    • MLA Citation guides. These will give you the basics on how to format your in-text citations and works cited page:
      • The MLA guide from Shoreline Community College–a helpful, color-coded, step-by-step guide to formatting citations correctly.
      • The MLA page at the Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab)
    • Quotation Mechanics Describes some of the basic rules for including a quotation in a sentence.
    • Plagiarism: What It is and How to Recognize and Avoid It (required), one of the Writing Guides (optional) at Indiana University.
    • Plagiarism Pages (all 5 pages are required--see the menu at the left) at the Purdue Online Writing Lab (optional)
    • Plagiarism, eh? How to recognize it and get it out of your life (optional). A Power-Point-style video: text plus a voice reading the text. You can find the original Powerpoint file here (requires Powerpoint or another program that can read .ppt files).
    • Research Paper Peer Review I Instructions
    • Research Paper Peer Review II Instructions
    • A sample research paper. This is a final draft of a strong paper—not perfect, but very well done. (PDF)
      • A sample paragraph, revised to show how it can be re-organized and enhanced with transitional devices to give it greater coherence (PDF).

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    Extra Credit Assignment

    You have the option of earning extra credit worth up to 5% of the final grade by writing an extra credit assignment. You can also earn a little extra credit, worth the equivalent of two homework assignments (approximately 1%), by doing some work to prepare for this assignment.

    Here are detailed instructions for each assignment:

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